Boiler Bay birding
NOTE: All of our Audubon birdwalks are free and open to the public. No prior experience is needed and you do not need to pre-register unless indicated. The walks are led by experienced birders and we provide the free use of binoculars and field guides. Dress for the weather as we hold our birdwalks rain or shine.

~ 2021 ~

COVID Alert: Due to the rising number of cases in Lincoln County, Masks will be required at all events and all safety protocols will be followed. We will post updates that affect our activities for each event here and on our Facebook pages.


 

DEC

BEYOND THE BEACH

We're partnering once again with Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition and Coast Range Association to bring you a series of webinars we're calling "Beyond the Beach."
Beyond the Beach: Protecting Oregon’s Rocky Coast
Wednesday, December 8, 6:30pm

The second in our series of "Beyond the Beach" webinars that focus on our nearshore waters beyond our sandy beaches. These rocky intertidal and teeming subtidal habitats are largely unseen, but are a critical part of our coast.

Oregon’s legendary 1967 Beach Bill provides the public with free and uninterrupted public access and use to all of Oregon’s beaches along its 364 mile coastline. Many beaches can be accessed from a dazzling array of state parks extending from Fort Stevens State Park at the mouth of the Columbia River south to Crissey Field State Recreation Site near the California border. In addition to providing beach access, these parks protect upland natural resources.

But how well protected is the rest of Oregon’s shoreline and offshore islands? While the offshore islands are protected and beach access is assured, much of Oregon’s shoreline below the ordinary mean high tide line lacks site specific protection measures.

Learn about the variety of marine designation types along the Oregon coast. Why do we need these designated marine sites? Find out where they are located and how to enjoy them in a responsible manner so their bountiful resources are available for generations to come.

We are thrilled to announce the panel discussion for this event will include Dave Fox (ODFW Resource Assessment and Management Section Leader ), Roy Lowe (retired USFWS Project Leader for the Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex), and Dick Vander Schaaf (The Nature Conservancy Associate Coast and Marine Conservation Director).

Brought to you by Lincoln City Audubon, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, and Coast Range Association.

Click here to register.

Christmas Bird Counts

All skill levels and ages are welcome...don't fret if you are a beginning birder as this is a perfect opportunity to learn more about our local birds while participating in this free citizen science event. During the Christmas Bird Count volunteers tally as many species and number of individual birds as they can from sunup to sundown. Considered the longest running Citizen Science survey in the world and led by the National Audubon Society, Christmas Bird Count data provides critical data on bird population trends.

We are fortunate to boast three count circles in our area:

Tillamook Bay CBC ~ Saturday, December 18, all day.
The Tillamook Christmas Bird Count is one of the oldest in the nation. The count circle stretches from Netarts north to Rockaway Beach and east to include the Kilchis and much more (see map PDF).

You will be assigned to a team of field counters with a specific area to cover. All experience levels are welcome!

Field counters need to dress for Oregon coast weather. Mud boots or sturdy shoes are recommended. Bring your own optical equipment. You will also want to bring a lunch or something to snack on throughout the day, plus plenty of water. (Most sector leaders do not stop for lunch.)

If that sounds too strenuous, or you just don't have the full day to spend, you can participate as a backyard/feeder counter if you live in the Tillamook bay area.

WANT TO PARTICIPATE?
Participation is FREE, but you do need to pre-register. Contact our Tillamook CBC coordinator Kathy Krall at krallfamily at comcast.net. This count is sponsored by the Audubon Society of Lincoln City.

Lincoln City CBC ~ Sunday, December 19, all day.
Join a team to count birds for our 7th annual Christmas Bird Count. Or, if you live in the Lincoln City area, you can participate by counting birds in your backyard. We meet at 6:30am at Sambo's and end the day with a “countdown” and potluck at 4:30pm at Connie Hansen Garden.

Field counters need to dress for Oregon coast weather. Mud boots or sturdy shoes are recommended. Bring your own optical equipment. You will also want to bring a lunch or something to snack on throughout the day, plus plenty of water. (Most sector leaders do not stop for lunch.)

If that sounds too strenuous, or you just don't have the full day to spend, you can participate as a backyard/feeder counter if you live in the Lincoln City area (see map). We will provide a checklist and guidelines.

WANT TO PARTICIPATE?
Participation is FREE, but you do need to pre-register. Contact our CBC planning team at aslcoregon@gmail.com. This count is sponsored by the Audubon Society of Lincoln City.

Yaquina Bay CBC ~ Wednesday, December 29th, all day
The 49th Annual Yaquina Bay Christmas Bird Count is quickly approaching and we need your help to serve on a field team or to conduct a feeder count. The Yaquina Bay count is within a 15 mile diameter circle that extends from Yaquina Head southward to Seal Rocks and eastward to Toledo (see map).

WANT TO PARTICIPATE?
Participation is FREE, but you do need to pre-register. Contact CBC coordinators Kai Frueh at Kaifrueh2@gmail.com or Hendrik & Oscar at hhactitis@gmail.com.

~ 2022 ~


 

DEC

Beyond the Beach: Oregon's Mysterious Undersea Kelp Forests
Wednesday, January 12, 6:30pm

The third in our series of "Beyond the Beach" webinars that focus on our nearshore waters beyond our sandy beaches. These rocky intertidal and teeming subtidal habitats are largely unseen, but are a critical part of our coast.

Bull kelp are large seaweeds that grow in “forests,” forming canopies in the Oregon coast's rocky subtidal waters. They draw deep curiosity from scientists because of their immense contributions to ocean health, and their dwindling numbers around the world. Recently, 35 years of satellite imagery has led to new insights into how Oregon's kelp forests work and how they are changing. Factors like climate change, heatwaves, storms, disease, otters, and urchins are changing the landscape of Oregon's kelp forests. So what did Oregon's kelp forests used to look like, how are they doing today, and how can Oregonians influence what they will look like 100 years into the future?

Sara Hamilton is a PhD student from Oregon State University, and a subtidal ecologist co-advised by Dr. Kirsten Grorud-Colvert and Dr. Bruce Menge. She studies kelp forest ecology in nearshore Oregon, focusing on population dynamics of bull kelp and trophic ecology of purple urchins. She is passionate about studying kelps and will share about current research conducted by divers on the southern Oregon coast, and about restoration and recovery of kelps in Oregon.

Brought to you by Lincoln City Audubon, Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, and Coast Range Association.

Click here to register.

Website designed by Ernie Rose, Rose Designs, Lincoln City, Oregon. Copyright: Audubon Society of Lincoln City.
Email: info@lincolncityaudubon.org


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